Sunday, March 08, 2009

5 Minutes of World of Goo

Limux version

Issues found in first five minutes
None

Five Minute Goodness
Gooey goodness. Looks, plays, sounds just great. If I liked this kind of game I would be right into it.

Score
7/10 I just think it deserves a seven.

Windows Version

Issues found in first five minutes
Only runs as administrator.

Five Minute Goodness
Gooey goodness. Looks, plays, sounds just great. If I liked this kind of game, and happened to be the system administrator, I would be right into it.

Score
0/10 Sorry, but any game... Game, get it? This is a game and not a disk formatting tool. This is not a DBMS or a web server or a mail server or a registry editor or a tool to add users to the system... This is a GAME dammit.

Uh, carried away. Starting again...

Score
0/10 Any game created this century that needs to be run as Administrator automatically gets a zero.

Thursday, March 05, 2009

5 Minutes of Elive 1.9.23

Hardware: Dell Latitude C610
CPU: Mobile P3 - M 1133MHz
RAM: 256MB
HDD: 20G
Video: ATI Radeon Mobility M6
Wireless: TP-Link TL-WN321G USB, Ralink chipset
LAN: 3Com 3c905c
Audio: Intel 82801CA/CAM AC97

Elive 1.9.23 (Unstable)
Installation:
This is another livecd install. The CD boots quickly enough. The install is pretty damn slow, but dead easy.

I use the unstable version because stable requires a payment to download, and I'm not about to do that for a five minute test-drive.

Did I mention the install is slow? Hell, just generating locales is slower than the entire knoppix install.

***Disclaimer: I did not time the knoppix install. I did not time the elive install. I make wildly unfounded claims based on nothing more than the level of frustratotron enzymes in my system at any given time. There is no such thing as a frustratotron enzyme (there probably should be). End Disclaimer***

But it really is slow.

Issues found in first five minutes.
When powering down the system, it says "System start in progress, hold on please".

Hibernate fails without data loss - ie it does not go to sleep then fail to resume; rather it fails to go to sleep and kicks back to the desktop with "Elive system, restored."

Menus happily cascade right off the screen.

Closing the lid blanks the screen. Opening the lid does not restore the screen. Nothing bar shutdown and restart restores the screen.

Enlightenment theme switcher - OK and Apply both do the same thing; apply the selected theme, and then close the application.

Five Minute Goodness:
Enlightenment e17. It's a beautiful thing, and not just because of the visuals. If you haven't seen e17, you're missing out. You should see e17.

I like the eLive panel, although would prefer to enter root password once, rather than every time I click an applet for system-wide settings.

Suspend to RAM works. On resume you get "Elive system, restored" in a voice that kinda reminds me of an old game. (C&C? Warzone 2100? Definitely an RTS)


Conclusion:
This post is way too short for conclusions, as was my testing. Oh, what the hell, here's your damn conclusion: I like it. I like it a lot.

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

5 Minutes of SimplyMepis 8.0.00

Hardware: Dell Latitude C610
CPU: Mobile P3 - M 1133MHz
RAM: 256MB
HDD: 20G
Video: ATI Radeon Mobility M6
Wireless: TP-Link TL-WN321G USB, Ralink chipset
LAN: 3Com 3c905c
Audio: Intel 82801CA/CAM AC97

SimplyMepis 8.0.00
Installation:
When I installed Fedora from the Live CD and found it to be incredibly slow, I blamed myself. This hardware, I said, is just not up to running a modern livecd.

Then I booted the Knoppix 6.0.1 CD, and it was outrageously fast. But still, I said, Knoppix is using LXDE, which is much lighter than Fedora's Gnome desktop.

But now after trying SimplyMepis, I am forced to conclude that the Fedora livecd really does just completely suck. It's not me, Fedora, it's you. Sorry. Had to be said.

SimplyMepis boots almost as quickly as Knoppix, but to a full KDE desktop. The installer is fast and fantastic, mostly, although it failed to set my timezone.

Issues found in first five minutes.
Suspends but will not resume. Hibernate fails completely, just bringing up a locked screen message.

On first boot I find that Mepis has set the clock forward three months and some hours, and believes I am in New York.

Five Minute Goodness:
It's fast. Wireless works. Everything works. Mepis provide their own helper applications for configuring the system, and they are mostly good. Nice visuals, from Grub menu, to splash screen, to desktop.

It's KDE and, mostly, it's Debian.

Conclusion:
This post is way too short for conclusions, as was my testing.

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

5 Minutes of Knoppix 6.0.1

Hardware: Dell Latitude C610
CPU: Mobile P3 - M 1133MHz
RAM: 256MB
HDD: 20G
Video: ATI Radeon Mobility M6
Wireless: TP-Link TL-WN321G USB, Ralink chipset
LAN: 3Com 3c905c
Audio: Intel 82801CA/CAM AC97

Knoppix 6.0.1
Installation:
Outrageously good. The livecd boots faster than most hdd installs. System booted, installed to hdd, and rebooted to hard drive install in less time than the Fedora livecd required just to get to a login prompt.

Issues found in first five minutes.
The only effect of selecting "Hibernate" is for the wireless connection to drop and then reconnect. Suspends, but then will not resume.

User is able to perform administrative tasks without a password prompt.

By default has repositories enabled for All branches of Debian - unstable, testing, stable, and experimental. Weird.

Five Minute Goodness:
Fast. Damn fast. LXDE with all Compiz Fusion effects enabled is quicker on this system than Gnome with no visual effects was on Fedora & Debian, so you can imagine how bad it makes Ubuntu look. (Hint: bad. Sloooooow).

"Initiating shutdown sequence."

Conclusion:
This post is way too short for conclusions, as was my testing.

Monday, March 02, 2009

5 Minutes of Slackware 12.2

Hardware: Dell Latitude C610
CPU: Mobile P3 - M 1133MHz
RAM: 256MB
HDD: 20G
Video: ATI Radeon Mobility M6
Wireless: TP-Link TL-WN321G USB, Ralink chipset
LAN: 3Com 3c905c
Audio: Intel 82801CA/CAM AC97

Slackware 12.2
Installation:
Text mode installer. I accept all defaults, even re-using the disk layout from previous distro (Fedora 10 - article). This proves to be a mistake because, although the Slackware installer recognises the LVM partition just fine and is happy to use it, Slackware kernel panics on first boot. I run setup again after formatting the drive without LVM, again selecting all defaults (which means installing "everything" and swapping disks twice). All is good.

Issues found in first five minutes.
Suspend fails. I forget to test hibernate. Hey, I'm working for free here. Shut up.

Cannot connect to wlan. Try for almost three minutes before giving up. What do you expect from a five minute test?

Five Minute Goodness:
As expected all devices are detected. Slackware is fast and responsive. Boots to command line - boy does that take me back... Fortunately I haven't forgotten how to type "startx".

Conclusion:
This post is way too short for conclusions, as was my testing.

Sunday, March 01, 2009

5 Minutes of Fedora 10

Hardware: Dell Latitude C610
CPU: Mobile P3 - M 1133MHz
RAM: 256MB
HDD: 20G
Video: ATI Radeon Mobility M6
Wireless: TP-Link TL-WN321G USB, Ralink chipset
LAN: 3Com 3c905c
Audio: Intel 82801CA/CAM AC97

Fedora 10 - Live CD Install
Installation:
Mind-bogglingly slow. Yes, some of you are probably thinking I'd have to be insane to run the livecd from a laptop cdrom in only 256MB of Ram. But it's what I had, so that's what I used. Also, it is possible I am insane. You should probably not rule that out.

I booted from the CD. At the same time I was burning an ISO of Slackware CD1. After burning the Slackware CD, searching for the CD writing Pen (Can never find that damn thing), labelling the CD and finding a CD sleeve (Dammit, they were around here some place) I only had to wait four or five more minutes for the Fedora CD to get to the login screen.

So then I Set Fedora to logging in and went to make a cup of coffee. Finished the coffee, and I am a slow slow coffee drinker, and then sat and waited for the login to finish...

Eventually got to the desktop and clicked the Install link. This prompted a further five to ten minute wait before the installer popped up.

Aside from a few longish delays between screens while the next part loaded the install itself was smooth and efficient and probably quicker than the OpenSuse install. First install I've done to date that defaults to LVM for partitioning.

Issues found in first five minutes.
Hibernate & Suspend both failed. Actually, Hibernate succeeded but xorg crashed and restarted after resume.

Right clicking the CD-Rom drive and selecting "Eject" gives an error "Unable to mount media", exactly as in Debian and Ubuntu. Isn't this a fairly obvious bug to have persist across multiple Gnome versions? (Well, at least two versions).

What's with the ugly progress bar on a black background when booting the system. It looks, well, incomplete.

Add/Remove Software was extremely slow, and only the "All Packages" selection showed any packages - all other categories give "No results were found". Updates to Packagekit fixed this last problem. Speed is still an issue.

Sound card was detected, but no sound. Packagekit frontend hung trying to update pulseaudio and alsa. Killed all packagekit & Yum processes and attempted running Yum from the command line. Yum complained of locks on package database. Rebooted and updated pulseaudio & alsa packages. Still no sound. Time to install something else. Slackware perhaps?

Five Minute Goodness:
As expected all devices detected, although sound did not work. Connected to wireless lan. Mostly felt responsive. Like the wallpaper.

Conclusion:
This post is way too short for conclusions, as was my testing.